A Sound of Thunder & Other Stories – Ray Bradbury

81P4Zoc38PL._SL1500_It’s kind of hard to review a story collection, especially one like this, because it includes 32 completely different short stories. So instead, I’m going to post mini reviews of four of the stories each month, for eight total posts. This month’s post is the third installment. Enjoy the next four stories, and if you missed them, check out the earlier posts here!


Embroidery

Three women sit on a porch, rocking in their rocking chairs and embroidering. Seems like a quaint picture of back-in-the-day small-town America, until you find out that the women are embroidering simply to pass the time until it happens.

The Big Black and White Game

At a summer resort, one of the biggest treats each year is watching the big Black and White game: a baseball game between the black hotel staff and the white hotel guests. You can probably imagine how such a thing might go down.

The Great Wide World Over There

Cora is thrilled for her nephew Benjy to come visit and teach her how to read and write, but she is so enthralled with watching him write that an entire summer passes without her ever picking up the pencil. I’m really loving these little “slice of life” stories, but they always have that tinge of sadness.

Powerhouse

A man and woman are traveling on horseback on their way to see her dying mother, and camp out for the night in a power station. She always thought she would never need religion, but the powerhouse brings her what might be her first religious experience.

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3 thoughts on “A Sound of Thunder & Other Stories – Ray Bradbury

  1. I read your posts via email or on my phone and didn’t realize you switched up Blog Themes. You did, right? Regardless, I LOVE the layout. Do you mind me asking what theme you are using?

    I tried to find this book at the library. No such luck. 🙁

    • I’ve had the same theme since I “rebranded,” but I’m glad you like it! It’s called “Expound.” 🙂

      As far as the book goes, I wouldn’t necessarily expect it to be under this name—I remember reading a Ray Bradbury collection in middle school titled “R is for Rocket” that I could never find outside of school. This seems to be a relatively new collection (new as in newly formatted to be sold, not new stories), but I’m sure you could find most of the stories in it in others that your library might have!

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